New Zealand Prime Minister questioned on Israeli passports

July 20, 2011 Agencies
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New Zealand’s Prime Minister John Key, has faced a barrage of questions from media following a report that the SIS [Security Intelligence Service] had ordered the national police computer system checked.

New Zealand media report that there were fears that Israelis may have loaded software onto the system while in the country to aid the search and rescue operation following the February earthquake in Christchurch.

The report states that an Israeli rescue team was removed by armed New Zealand authorities when they were discovered to be in the “red zone” without accreditation.

Key told media the Netanyahu had made several phone calls to him during the aftermath of the earthquake. He said he could not confirm that one of the Israelis involved in the earthquake itself had been carrying five passports.

Three Israelis were among the 181 victims of the earthquake.

Labour leader Phil Goff is reported as having called on the NZ Government to come clean about what it knows about suspicious activities.

Israeli Ambassador Shemi Tzur has described the current events as being “science fiction”.

The NZSIS told J-Wire: “NZSIS will not be commenting on this issue and is referring any enquiries regarding this matter to the Prime Minister’s office.”

 

Comments

2 Responses to “New Zealand Prime Minister questioned on Israeli passports”
  1. incognito34 says:

    brilliant!

  2. Lynne Newington says:

    When listening to the accusation of a backpacker having five passorts on his person and a possible Mossad involvement, due to the numerous phone calls by the Israli Government and the sudden return of the body back to the country, I thought to myself. Whats new.
    Why wouldn’t they want the body of a patriot returned as soon as possible.
    The same with the Japanese tragedy, the Israli Government were quick to look for their own there too with a search and rescue team soon on the spot.
    The passports issue just a red herring, considering the regulations of entry to other countries as a traveller, any traveller.